10 Supplements To Reduce C-reactive protein (CRP)

10 Supplements To Reduce C-reactive protein (CRP)

There are a number of evidence-based dietary supplements which have been shown to significantly reduce levels of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP).

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant, a protein made by the liver that is a marker for inflammation and infection.

Increased levels of CRP are thought to be associated with an increased risk of developing CVD and diabetes.

Chronic low-grade systemic inflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of many common health problems from autoimmune disorders to cardiovascular disease.

In this article we are going to take a look at the dietary supplements with the strongest evidence for their ability to lower serum/plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP).



1. Magnesium

Magnesium Supplements Reduces C-reactive Protein (CRP)

Magnesium supplements have been shown to significantly reduce levels of C-reactive protein (CRP).

Research also finds that magnesium deficiency may play a role in chronic low-grade inflammation.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies published 2018 evaluated the effect of magnesium (Mg) supplementation on C-reactive protein (CRP) concluding:

This meta-analysis suggests that Mg supplementation significantly reduces serum CRP level. [1]

Another systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials published 2017 evaluated the effect of oral magnesium supplementation on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and concluded:

Results of the present meta-analysis indicated that magnesium supplementation reduces CRP levels among individuals with inflammation (CRP levels > 3 mg/dL).

This finding suggests that magnesium supplements may have a beneficial role as an adjuvant for the management of low-grade chronic systemic inflammation. [2]

2. Pycnogenol (French Maritime Pine Bark Extract)

Pycnogenol C-reactive Protein

Pycnogenol® (PYC) is an extract of the French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster) and is a rich source of flavonoids.

Extracts from the bark of French Maritime Pine have a long historical use for being used to treat inflammation and to improve general health.

Pycnogenol’s main active components are polyphenolic compounds (these compounds consist of catechin, taxifolin, procyanidins of various chain lengths formed by catechin and epicatechin units, and phenolic acids.

These phyto-chemicals have diverse biological activities including potent antioxidant/free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties.

A systematic review and meta-analysis published 2018 evaluated the effect of Pycnogenol supplementation on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations concluding:

Present systematic review and meta-analysis suggested Pycnogenol consumption can decrease the level of CRP and have anti-inflammatory effect. [3]

3. Alpha-Lipoic Acid

Alpha-Lipoic Acid Supplements Reduce C-reactive Protein

Alpha-Lipoic Acid supplements have been shown to reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP).

α-lipoic acid (ALA, thioctic acid) is an organosulfur compound derived from caprylic acid (also known as octanoic acid).

Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) is probably most known for its ability to treat diabetic neuropathy and is also regarded as a potent mitochondrial antioxidant.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials published 2018 assessed the effects of alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in clinical trial studies.

The systematic review and meta-analysis concluded:

Results of the current meta-analysis study showed that alpha-lipoic acid supplementation could significantly decrease CRP level in patients with elevated levels of this inflammatory marker. [4]

4. Probiotics

Probiotic Supplements Reduce C-reactive Protein (CRP)

The link between digestive health, the composition of the gut microbiome, microbial dysbiosis and the development of inflammatory related conditions continues to grow.

The gut microbiota don’t just play a role in modulating and regulating intestinal inflammation.

Conditions such as increased intestinal permeability (leaky gut) and the resulting increased bacterial translocation are well known risk factors for activating systemic IO&NS (inflammatory, oxidative & nitrosative stress) pathways in the body.

Probiotic supplementation has been shown in many studies to significantly reduce serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines including hs-CRP, TNF-a, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-4.

Some of the most well known strains of probiotic bacteria include Lactobacillus acidophilusLactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacteria.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies published 2017 evaluated the impact of probiotic administration on serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations.

The systematic review and meta-analysis concluded:

This meta-analysis suggests that probiotic administration may significantly reduce serum CRP. [5]

5. Quercetin

Quercetin Supplements C-reactive protein

Quercetin is one of the most abundantly consumed flavonoids in the human diet and is found naturally in many foods such as fruits, vegetables(red onions are a great source), herbs, seeds and grains.

Quercetin has shown numerous therapeutic benefits in studies including potent anti-inflammatory effect, antiviral activities, reducing blood pressure, improving lipid profile, attenuating lipid peroxidation, platelet aggregation and capillary permeability, amongst other biological activities.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled human trials published in 2017 assessed the effect of Quercetin supplements on C-reactive protein (CRP).

Our findings showed a significant effect of quercetin supplementation on the C-reactive protein-especially at doses above 500 mg/day and in patients with CRP <3 mg/l. [6]

6. Vitamin C

Vitamin C Supplements C-reactive protein

Vitamin C may help to benefit inflammatory disorders through its antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effect.

Inflammatory disorders and oxidative stress are both connected, through the production of reactive oxygen species, the inflammatory process may deplete stores of antioxidants, including vitamin C and others.

A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials published 2018 assessed the effect of Vitamin C supplementation on serum C-reactive protein and hs-CRP Concentrations.

The meta-analysis concluded:

The present meta-analysis shows that vitamin C supplementation reduces serum CRP level, particularly in younger subjects, with higher CRP baseline level, at a lower dosage and intravenous administration. [7]

7. Cinnamon

Cinnamon Inflammation C-reactive protein

The fragrant spice Cinnamon (Cinnamomum Zeylanicum) has a long history of culinary and medicinal usage.

Numerous studies have reported the anti-inflammatory properties of Cinnamon, amongst many other biological activities including antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-cancer, improving insulin sensitivity, lowering lipids and much more.

A meta-analysis and systematic review published in 2019 on the effect of Cinnamon supplement on C-reactive protein concluded:

Cinnamon supplementation improves levels of serum CRP, particularly in chronic conditions where basal CRP levels are raised. [8]

8. Ginger

Ginger Inflammation C-reactive Protein

The rhizome of Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) is an aromatic spice that has traditionally been used to treat inflammatory diseases due to its potent anti-inflammatory properties.

Ginger contains phenolic compounds such as gingerol, paradol, and shogaol, which have shown diverse health promoting effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-cancer and anti-atherosclerotic properties.

A systematic review and meta-analysis published 2016 assessed the effect of Ginger supplements on serum C-reactive protein, lipid profile and glycaemia concluding:

This meta-analysis suggests that ginger supplementation significantly reduces serum CRP. [9]

9. Zinc

Zinc Supplements C-reactive protein

The mineral Zinc is another supplement which has shown in clinical research to reduce serum levels of inflammatory marker C-reactive protein.

Zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation and can exacerbate the inflammatory response.

Zinc is also involved in modulating the inflammatory response, by helping to regulate inflammatory cytokines.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials published 2018 evaluated the effects of Zinc supplementation on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations concluding:

In conclusion, zinc supplementation may have a beneficial effect on the serum CRP, especially at doses equal to 50 mg/d and in renal insufficiency patients compared with healthy subjects. [10]

10. Curcumin

Turmeric Curcumin Inflammation C-reactive Protein

Turmeric root (Curcuma longa) is a popular spice used for both culinary purposes and medicinally due to its diverse health benefits including antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects.

One of the main bioactive components of Turmeric root is the polyphenol Curcumin, which has shown potent anti-inflammatory activity in numerous studies.

The effectiveness of Curcumin as an anti-inflammatory agent and for reducing inflammatory markers such as CRP appears to be highly dependent on the form of Curcumin supplements used.

More bioavailable forms which can significantly increase the bioavailability of Curcumin such as Micellar Curcumin are preferred.

Evidence from a meta-analysis published in 2014 concluded:

Compared with placebo, supplementation with curcuminoids was associated with a significant reduction in circulating CRP levels. [11]

Recommended Product: Micellar Curcumin – YourZooki

References

[1] Effect of magnesium supplements on serum C-reactive protein: a systematic review and meta-analysis

[2] Effect of Magnesium Supplementation on Plasma C-reactive Protein Concentrations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

[3] The Effect of Pycnogenol Supplementation on Plasma C-Reactive Protein Concentration: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

[4] Effects of alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on C-reactive protein level: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

[5] Impact of Probiotic Administration on Serum C-Reactive Protein Concentrations: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Control Trials

[6] Effects of supplementation with quercetin on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

[7] A Meta-analysis of Randomized Control Trials: The Impact of Vitamin C Supplementation on Serum CRP and Serum hs-CRP Concentrations

[8] Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum Zeylanicum) supplementation on serum C-reactive protein concentrations: A meta-analysis and systematic review

[9] The effect of ginger supplementation on serum C-reactive protein, lipid profile and glycaemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

[10] The effect of zinc supplementation on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

[11] Are curcuminoids effective C-reactive protein-lowering agents in clinical practice? Evidence from a meta-analysis

The information in this article has not been evaluated by the FDA and should not be used to diagnose, cure or treat any disease, implied or otherwise.

Always consult with a qualified healthcare professional before making any significant dietary or lifestyle changes including supplements and herbs.


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